More from: irs

Stats 2018

In year 2018 Adult Life Training, Inc. provided 4,900 hours training to 980 attending Senior Aides, who earned 28 certificates in basic computer job skills.

in year 2018 Adult Life Training, Inc. provided 176 hours of training in Financial Literacy to 88 attending citizens, training them with the knowledge and tools they need to get and stay out of debt, have three to six months expenses saved in advance in their emergency fund, and invest for their children’s college and their own retirement expenses. These free public workshops were underwritten by a generous grant from the 3Rivers Federal Credit Union Foundation. 3Rivers is Here for you: here for good. If you’re ready to start a lifelong banking relationship with a local organization you can trust, then 3Rivers is for you. https://www.3riversfcu.org/

This represents an increase in persons trained from 571 in year 2017 to 1068 in year 2018, and from 2,318 hours in 2017 to 5,076 hours in 2018.

More details on Adult Life Training, Inc., it’s board members, and its social impact can be found on GuideStar at https://www.guidestar.org/profile/59-3782924

Tax information concerning Adult Life Training, Inc. can be freely accessed from the United States Treasury Department page at https://apps.irs.gov/app/eos/displayAll.do?dispatchMethod=displayAllInfo&Id=4905102&ein=593782924&country=US&deductibility=all&dispatchMethod=searchAll&isDescending=false&city=&ein1=&postDateFrom=&exemptTypeCode=al&submitName=Search&sortColumn=orgName&totalResults=1&names=Adult+life+Training+inc or Browse to www.irs.gov and POINT TO the large blue Charities & Nonprofits button at the top right of the page, then click the Item labeled “Tax Exempt Organization Search”. Enter “Adult Life Training Inc” to see all tax returns and data since year 2007.


Tax Credits Information available from IRS Now

This in email from IRS today. The child tax credits for 2018 has drastically INCREASED over 2018 – working poor and middle class families get about twice as much credit as previously, including for special needs children older than 17. Details on how to get the money are at the IRS link via govdelivery.com. The content of their email is as follows:


Issue Number:    IR-2018- 217


Get Ready for Taxes:
Here’s how the new tax law revised family tax credits

WASHINGTON – More families will be able to get more money under the newly-revised Child Tax Credit, according to the Internal Revenue Service.

This is the third in a series of reminders to help taxpayers get ready for the upcoming tax filing season. Additionally, the IRS has recently updated a special page on its website with steps to take now for the 2019 tax filing season.

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), the tax reform legislation passed in December 2017, doubled the maximum Child Tax Credit, boosted income limits to be able to claim the credit, and revised the identification number requirement for 2018 and subsequent years. The new law also created a second smaller credit of up to $500 per dependent aimed at taxpayers supporting older children and other relatives who do not qualify for the Child Tax Credit.

“As we approach the 2019 tax-filing season, I want to remind taxpayers to take advantage of this valuable tax credit if they are eligible to claim it,” said IRS Commissioner Chuck Rettig. “Tax reform changed the tax code significantly and doubling the Child Tax Credit is an example of how the changes impact taxpayers.”

Here are some important things taxpayers need to know as they plan for the tax-filing season in early 2019:

Child Tax Credit increased

Higher income limits mean more families are now eligible for the Child Tax Credit. The credit begins to phase out at $200,000 of modified adjusted gross income, or $400,000 for married couples filing jointly, which is up from the 2017 levels of $75,000 for single filers or $110,000 for married couples filing jointly.

Increased from $1,000 to $2,000 per qualifying child, the credit applies if the child is younger than 17 at the end of the tax year, the taxpayer claims the child as a dependent, and the child lives with the taxpayer for more than six months of the year. The qualifying child must also have a valid Social Security Number issued before the due date of the tax return, including extensions.

Up to $1,400 of the credit can be refundable for each qualifying child. This means an eligible taxpayer may get a refund even if they don’t owe any tax.

For more information, see Publication 972, Child Tax Credit, available soon on IRS.gov.

New Credit for Other Dependents

A new tax credit – Credit for Other Dependents — is available for dependents for whom taxpayers cannot claim the Child Tax Credit. These dependents may include dependent children who are age 17 or older at the end of 2018 or parents or other qualifying relatives supported by the taxpayer.

During the upcoming tax-filing season, the IRS urges taxpayers to use the agency’s Interactive Tax Assistant to see if they qualify for either of these credits. To find out more, visit IRS.gov.


Now You can check Public Charities’ Tax Filings

News Release!IRS Makes Electronically Filed Form 990 Data Available in New Format

WASHINGTON – The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) announced that the publicly available data on electronically filed Forms 990 will now be available for the first time in a machine-readable format through Amazon Web Services (AWS). The publicly available data does not include donor information or other personally identifiable information. Today’s launch of this effort marks an important step forward in access to this important public data.

Previously, this Form 990 data was only available in image files. This data, which includes filings from 2011 to the present, will now be available as an XML file that is downloadable from the web via AWS.

“The publicly available information on the Form 990 series is vital to those interested in the tax-exempt community,” said IRS Commissioner John Koskinen. … Data from Form 990-N (e-postcard) used by certain smaller exempt organizations is not available with this data, but it can be accessed through IRS.gov.